Confessions of a Waterfall Junkie

Anybody else feel incredibly moved by the power of a waterfall? Anybody feel more connected, whether it’s to nature, to a partner or loved one, or perhaps to something bigger than us when in the midst of water crashing to the ground right before your eyes? If you are familiar with, and yearn for this connection, then Powell River should be your destination of choice in 2010.

Eagle Falls

It was this passion for falling water that fuelled my love for photography. Shooting waterfalls can be fun, challenging and rewarding, but arguably the best part of the mission for me is getting there. The fresh smells of the rainforest trail, the sound of plunging water getting louder by the second, the anticipation of that connection I spoke of earlier, each moment contributes to the overall journey. I’ve seen, and shot, many waterfalls in my time, from iconic ones like Athabasca Falls in the Canadian Rockies, to some lesser-known gems like Saltery Falls right here in Powell River.

Athabasca Falls Winter Dance

Upper Eagle Falls

No matter the waterfall, the connection is always the desired end-result. And in some cases, it is these lesser-known waterfalls that offer the more enriching experience. Although Athabasca Falls is thunderously captivating, with its blue-green hues and towering mountains as its backdrop, the journey is not much more than a 5-minute walk from the parking lot. You certainly feel the falls when you get to it, just don’t expect to feel it in privacy.

Waterfall in Johnston Canyon, Banff National Park

In my many treks to the iconic falls of Jasper, I have never seen it stark of tourists, not even in the winter. This is where those less iconic waterfalls fill the emotional gap, and they do it extremely well here on the upper Sunshine Coast.

Saltery Falls along the Sunshine Coast Trail in Powell River

The Blackwater Trail, in rural Powell River is a prime example of how the experience effectively works as a whole, how a perfect connection is achieved. As part of an awe-inspiring circuit of interconnected trails that make up the Duck Lake/Mud Lake Trail system, the Blackwater Trail is a 4-km loop that offers some of the best rugged rainforest terrain, climaxing with not one breathtaking waterfall, but two. This hike is so diverse that even the drive up to the trailhead is rewarding, passing through aspen groves, alongside beautiful lakes and powerful rivers. Once at the trail head, the trek begins with an unmistakable attack on your senses. Every turn reminds you that you are in the heart of BC’s west coast rainforest. The rich greens and browns provide a wild sense of peace and tranquility. As the trail continues along the Blackwater Creek, the anticipation continues to build as the terrain becomes slightly steeper and the sound of the creek begins to intensify. At about 1.5 km, the trail delivers its first stunning waterfall; Kelly Falls.

Taking in Kelly Falls along the Blackwater Trail

Although it’s easy to mistake the waterfall site with the rainforest oasis found in the Endor Village, home of George Lucas’ Ewoks, make no mistake this is Powell River. The twenty (ish) foot waterfall plunges through open terrain, offering many inspiring vistas and perspectives to consider.

Best of all, hikers are led straight to the heart of the waterfall by a rustic, yet immaculately built boardwalk that crosses the creek. Thanks to the tireless efforts of Powell River’s own BOMB (Bloody Old Men’s Brigade) Squad, these boardwalks are common to this trail system and greatly enhance the enjoyment of, and accessibility to trail highlights. Complete with a walk-in campsite and picnic table, Kelly Falls is a must-see for those that enjoy experiencing the unmistakable pulse offered by such rugged nature. But your day of discovery does not end here, time to get back on the trail and ascend towards the second waterfall, David Lam Falls.

Spectacular David Lam Falls along Blackwater Trail

Standing at an impressive sixty (ish) feet tall, David Lam Falls is considered one of the tallest of its kind on the upper Sunshine Coast. The trail winds down towards the base of the falls complete with a standing platform for optimal viewing (and feeling). The invigorating spray of this falls is a reminder of just how powerful this wilderness is and how nature can rock the very foundation of one’s soul, at least the soul of an admitted waterfall geek anyways.

For more information on the Duck Lake/Mud Lake Trail System and for an online map, visit http://www.discoverpowellriver.com and click the maps tab. The Coast in Focus photography workshop is now half full, so be sure to contact me today to secure your spot for the May 28-30 event. We’ll definitely get out to one, if not several of these Sunshine Coast waterfalls to shoot!

Flooded River near Duck Lake Trails